Thursday, January 9, 2014

"The Trial of Dr. Kate," by Michael E. Glasscock III

This full-length work of contemporary lit is just 99 cents today!

The Trial of Dr. Kate, by Michael E. Glasscock III
321 pages, with a 4.0-star rating from 2 reviews

"Thoroughly enjoyed it! The trial of Dr. Kate takes us back to Round Rock in the 1950’s, about 10 years after Little Joe (book 1). Dr. Kate is the daughter of Dr. Marlow from Little Joe and she works ridiculously hard for the people of Parson’s County. Now she’s been charged with the murder of one of her patients, and she can’t remember what happened that day. Shenandoah Coleman, now a reporter with the Memphis Express, is back in Round Rock to cover the trial. 

Though the trial is about Dr. Kate, Glasscock brings depth to several different characters in this story. We learn about their histories via reminiscing and through conversation between characters. I thoroughly enjoyed the romantic element in this novel. It was sweet and clean. This time the romance was between a widower with a child and an independent woman with no aspirations toward motherhood. It was very amusing to see her willingness (and ineptitude at her attempt at childcare). 

I felt that I really connected with Dr. Kate and liked her attitude of equality with the black people in her community. I thoroughly disliked the Sheriff on the other hand who used his authority to belittle black people, put them down, and bully those he didn’t like. 

I was shocked by some of the surprising twists near the conclusion of the story. They did make for an ending I did not expect, so be sure this is not your typical formula for a book. 

 Michael Glasscock is a very smooth writer. His people are believable, their dialogue flows the way people really talk to one another. This was altogether an enjoyable book. I highly recommend it. I gave it 5 stars." -- Amazon reviewer

Book Two of the Round Rock Series

A doctor who can’t remember her crime.
A reporter fighting for the story of her life.
Two women at a crossroads in a town that never forgets.

In the summer of 1952, Lillian Johnson was found dead in her home, slumped in the wheelchair that had become her cage due to multiple sclerosis. An overdose of barbiturate had triggered a heart attack, but the scene was not quite right. It looked as though someone other than Lillian herself had injected the fatal dose.

Dr. Kate Marlow, Lillian’s physician and best friend, now sits in the Round Rock city jail. The only country doctor for miles, Kate cannot remember her whereabouts at the time of Lillian’s death⎯and the small Tennessee town buzzes with judgment.

As Dr. Kate’s trial approaches, another woman is determined to uncover the truth about the night of Lillian’s death. Memphis reporter Shenandoah Coleman grew up in Round Rock on the wrong side of the tracks, but unlike the rest of her unsavory clan, escaped her destiny. Now, back in the town she grew up in, she’ll have to turn every stone to keep Kate from a guilty verdict.

The Trial of Dr. Kate is the second novel in a four-part series from Michael E. Glasscock III that explores the intricate social cloth of Round Rock, Tennessee. Though each story stands alone, readers who enjoyed Glasscock’s first Round Rock tale, Little Joe, will delight in the cameo appearances in this one.


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Meet the Author

For the first eight years of his life Michael E. Glasscock III lived on his grandfather's cattle ranch a few miles south of the small community of Utopia, Texas. At the beginning of World War II, he moved to a small town in Tennessee not unlike the mythical Round Rock portrayed in his fiction series. Michael decided to study medicine, and he graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School at age twenty-four.

Nashville, Tennessee, was the site of his otology/neurotology practice, where he was associated with Vanderbilt University as a clinical professor, and where he continues to be part of the faculty as an adjunct professor. He retired from full-time clinical practice in 1997 and moved back to Texas where he continues to work as a consultant for three major medical device companies. He currently resides in Austin, Texas.

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