Saturday, September 14, 2013

"Full Moon Saturday Night," by John Ellis

Full Moon Saturday Night, by John Ellis

"This serious new author brings solid personal credentials to the task at hand. "Full Moon Saturday Night" defines the multiple `scary' medical and military scenarios that emerged during our long `cold war". Ellis writes about what he knows best, the insanity of a rural hospital's emergency room and the monumental task of a young doctor to exert control over the uncontrollable. Ellis does this with an exciting read based on his own personal career trials. While the novel concerns itself with the "rural doc" years, Ellis knows the `cold war' background of these times, serving as a ranking Air Force officer whose career offers the prospect of future excellent writing endeavors. In the novel's opening pages, we find the protagonist's father, a SAC bomber pilot , shepherding another more deadly full moon, Saturday night across the wasteland of the `50s-`60s game of `chicken' we played so dauntingly with the Soviet Union. Ellis' fresh pen gives us an exciting read across a region and time and profession in rapid transition. So take 5 stars, doctor! The reader should look forward to a possible film or, at a minimum, more cold war/medical thrillers that Everyman can embrace." -- Amazon reviewer

Ronny Campbell, a military kid raised in Texas, has graduated from medical school—but he is heavily in debt and feeling adrift. An ER staffing company leads him to his first job as an ER physician in a remote southern town and Ronny finds the work exciting. The job goes mostly as expected for a while…but then things get complicated. Ronny has forged a bond with a beautiful ER nurse, as people are apt to do in extreme circumstances of tragedies and triumphs. But the nurse’s psychopathic husband—a cop who is becoming increasingly paranoid—begins to interpret her most innocent encounters as a deadly threat. Add a local factory, driven by extreme greed and total disregard for their workers’ safety, that draws Ronny into a web of terror, and life in this isolated town just got a little crazier. Full Moon Saturday Night takes the reader into the trenches of emergency room medicine—a breeding ground for the bizarre and unexpected. The book is fast-paced, highly entertaining, and suspenseful, yet grounded by the author’s real-life experience as an ER doctor.

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Meet the Author

John Ellis, MD is a graduate of Indiana University Medical School, and also holds a MPH from the University of Wisconsin and a MBA from Marymount University. He attributes his love of writing to his Evansville, Indiana Bosse High School English teacher, Ms. Scarbrough. He served as a SAC flight surgeon at Bergstom Air Force base, Texas in the 1960's. As a flight surgeon supporting the medical contingent at LBJ's ranch, John traveled many times on Air Force One with the president. In 1968, he left his active duty Air Force career and began private medical practice in Lubbock, Texas. Later, he was recruited to join the FAA as an Assistant Regional Flight Surgeon. He remained in the Air Force Reserve throughout his career, and was recalled to active duty during the Vietnam years. He attained the rank of Colonel, and was selected for a four year term at the Pentagon as Special Assistant for Medical Programs at Headquarters, USAF. He was awarded the Legion of Merit for his work there. He resumed his former work in emergency departments in Georgia and Virginia. During his medical career, he was a certified specialist in Family Practice and held a second specialty in Occupational Medicine. In 1983, he authored Running Into Trouble, a short book on fitness which will soon be revised and republished on Kindle. He has been a contributor to several other books and to one medical textbook. He resides with his wife, Helen, in the Virginia suburbs of Washington, DC.

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