Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Kindle Daily Deals (August 26, 2014): A mystery, a romance, a sports memoir, sci-fi from the 50s and a humorous novel for teens!



Here's today's Kindle Daily Deal, available for $1.99!

Uniform Justice: A Commissario Brunetti Novel (A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery), by Donna Leon.

As Uniform Justice opens, Venetian detective Commissario Guido Brunetti is called to investigate a parent's worst nightmare. A young cadet has been found hanged, a presumed suicide, in Venice's elite military academy. Brunetti's sorrow for the boy, so close in age to his own son, is rivaled only by his contempt for a community that is more concerned with protecting the reputation of the school, and its privileged students, than understanding this tragedy. The young man is the son of a doctor and former politician, a man of an impeccable integrity all too rare in Italian politics. Dr. Moro is clearly and understandably devastated by his son's death; but while both he and his apparently estranged wife seem convinced that the boy's death could not have been suicide, neither appears eager to talk to the police or involve Brunetti in any investigation of the circumstances in which he died.

As Brunetti pursues his inquiry, he is faced with a wall of silence. Is the military protecting its own? And what of the other witnesses? Is this the natural reluctance of Italians to involve themselves with the authorities, or is Brunetti facing a conspiracy far greater than this one death?

275 pages, with a 3.8-star rating from 69 reviews



Here's today's Daily Romance Deal, available for $1.99!

Starstruck Romance and Other Hollywood Tails: A Second Acts Novel, by Julia Dumont.

As her Second Acts Dating Service truly takes off, Cynthia Amas discovers that in the heady world of high-end Hollywood romance, with success comes complexity. In this wildly seductive romp through the lush canyons and lavish neighborhoods of Los Angeles, the line between business and pleasure quickly blurs in a dizzying rush of sex and celebrity. Just as our heroine’s uncanny genius for matching up her growing roster of exclusive love seekers continues to deepen, her own love life reaches a fever pitch. Things get complicated. And funny. And excruciatingly sensual.

Cynthia’s high-maintenance lovelorn mother, her maddeningly hot ex-fling Max, a long-lost high school crush, and of course her best friend, the libidinous, star-crazed Lolita and her mysterious pack of telepathic canines, are all along for the ride. Not to mention one very rich, very famous film producer. On top of everything else, her newest, most important client is literally the biggest movie star in the world. In more ways than one. When it comes to extra curriculars, he is the hardest-working stud in show business. Try as Cynthia may to hook him up with any number of gorgeous ladies in waiting, his notoriously one-track mind is set on her. She’s determined to steer the dating service to the next level, but it’s hard to focus, let alone keep your hands on the wheel, when you’re hot, bothered, and nearly driven to distraction along the steamy highways and byways of love and lust. What a way to make a living.

271 pages, with a 4.4-star rating from 12 reviews



Here's today's Daily Non-Fiction Deal, available for $0.99!

Hate Mail from Cheerleaders: And Other Adventures in the Life of Reilly, by Rick Reilly.

For years, many of Sports Illustrated's 21 million readers turned first to the magazine's last page, because that's where they find SI's most popular feature: the Life of Reilly column, written by best-selling author Rick Reilly.

A 22-year veteran of Sports Illustrated and a 10-time National Sportswriter of the Year, Reilly took over SI's back page in 1998, and his column immediately attracted a devoted following, including the legions of fans who helped make his first collection, The Life of Reilly, a New York Times best seller in 2000.

Now comes Hate Mail from Cheerleaders, 100 of Reilly's favorites, along with a new foreword and column postscripts by the author. Alternately sidesplitting and heartwarming but always opinionated and provocative, these pieces are the best work by the best columnist in the business.

318 pages, with a 4.7-star rating from 55 reviews



Here's today's Daily Science Fiction/Fantasy Deal, available for $0.99!

Honeymoon in Hell (The Galaxy Project), by Fredric Brown.

HONEYMOON IN HELL appeared in the second issue of GALAXY dated November 1950. (Brown’s THE LAST MARTIAN had appeared in the first issue a month previous.) Brown’s name on the table of contents of the first two issues, along with the names of other major contributors to ASTOUNDING--Clifford Simak, Isaac Asimov, Theodore Sturgeon, Fritz Leiber, Anthony Boucher--made clear that Gold was going directly after John W. Campbell’s audience and the stories which he had printed were of a different order from what these writers had sold ASTOUNDING. They were darker, more socially aware, in cases (Fritz Leiber’s COMING ATTRACTION) sexually frank in a fashion inconceivable in Campbell’s magazine. This novelette, dealing frankly with copulation and its desired consequences, was managed in a way far less euphemistic than had been the Campbellian norm and Brown, as he was to do often in the stories to follow, used a satirical attack which if it did not question magazine taboos certainly parodied them. The covers of pulp magazines such as PLANET or STARTLING depicted monsters putting near-naked females in peril, but the narratives under the cover by design offered no equivalent. Brown’s hastily married couple, sent to the Moon to see if they could breed a male child (all births on Earth over recent months have been female), encounter problems emotional as well as practical. Difficult as it may be to understand sixty years later, the employment of the word “hell” in a magazine cover title was also an act of provocation. The story was a provocation in its entirety, although, of course--and as Paul di Filippo suggests in his introduction--perhaps you had to be there.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Fredric Brown (1906-1972) was the only writer to achieve equal prominence in the mystery and science fiction. NIGHT OF THE JABBERWOCKY (1947) won the first MWA Edgar for first novel and all of his mysteries remain much in demand overseas where he has always been very popular. Several of those mysteries (THE SCREAMING MIMI, 1958) were adapted for film. Brown’s science fiction includes novels (WHAT MAD UNIVERSE, MARTIANS GO HOME!) and shorter work regarded as classics of the form (ARENA, THE STAR MOUSE, PLACET IS A CRAZY PLACE). He was also the acknowledged master of the short-short story; a famous collection, NIGHTMARES AND GEEZENSTACKS (1954) demonstrates his consistent mastery of a form self-limited to a top wordage of 500. ARENA (1944) was the basis of a famed Star Trek episode, MARTIANS GO HOME! was adapted for a 1992 film; THE LAST MARTIAN was adapted for Serling’s THE TWILIGHT ZONE and starred Steve McQueen at the start of his career. Poor health (weak lungs) forced Brown into Arizona retirement in 1963 and he published only one short story in collaboration in his last eight years. His work, forty years after his death, is increasingly prominent.

ABOUT THE SERIES

Horace Gold led GALAXY magazine from its first issue dated October 1950 to science fiction’s most admired, widely circulated and influential magazine throughout its initial decade. Its legendary importance came from publication of full length novels, novellas and novelettes. GALAXY published nearly every giant in the science fiction field.

The Galaxy Project is a selection of the best of GALAXY with new forewords by some of today’s best science fiction writers. The initial selections in alphabetical order include work by Ray Bradbury, Frederic Brown, Lester del Rey, Robert A. Heinlein, Damon Knight, C. M. Kornbluth, Walter M. Miller, Jr., Frederik Pohl, Robert Scheckley, Robert Silverberg, William Tenn (Phillip Klass) and Kurt Vonnegut with new Forewords by Paul di Filippo, David Drake, John Lutz, Barry Malzberg and Robert Silverberg. The Galaxy Project is committed to publishing new work in the spirit GALAXY magazine and its founding editor Horace Gold.

150 pages, with a 4.2-star rating from 17 reviews



Happy Reading!

Betsy

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