Thursday, August 1, 2013

Kindle Daily Deals: The Way of Santiago, a historical romance, a fantasy and a thriller for middle-graders

Today's Daily Deals include a non-fiction account of pilgrimage, a historical romance, a fantasy and a middle-grade thriller.

Here's today's Kindle Daily Deal, available for $1.99 today!

Paris to the Pyrenees: A Skeptic Pilgrim Walks the Way of Saint James, by David Downie.

Part adventure story, part cultural history, Paris to the Pyrenees explores the phenomenon of pilgrimage along the age-old way of Saint James
Driven by curiosity, wanderlust, and health crises, David Downie and his wife set out from Paris to walk across France to the Pyrenees. Starting on the Rue Saint-Jacques, then trekking 750 miles south to Roncesvalles, Spain, their eccentric route takes 72 days on Roman roads and pilgrimage paths—a 1,100-year-old network of trails leading to the sanctuary of Saint James the Greater. It is best known as El Camino de Santiago de Compostela—“The Way” for short.
The object of any pilgrimage is an inward journey manifested in a long, reflective walk. For Downie, the inward journey met the outer one: a combination of self-discovery and physical regeneration. More than 200,000 pilgrims take the highly commercialized Spanish route annually, but few cross France. Downie had a goal: to go from Paris to the Pyrenees on age-old trails, making the pilgrimage in his own maverick way.

352 pages, with a 4.3-star rating from 31 reviews. Text to Speech, X-Ray, Lending enabled.



Here's today's Daily Romance Deal, available for $1.99 today!

Wonderful, by Jill Barnett.

War weary knight, Merrick de Beaucourt, wants nothing more than a simple life, a peaceful wife, and to oversee his new earldom. What he gets instead are orders from his king, Camrose Castle on the wild and rebellious Welsh borders, and a completely unbiddable wife. For six long years, Lady Clio has waited for her betrothed..waited, and waited. Once the news arrives that he is returning, Clio returns to Camrose to again await the man who ignored her, but now determined to make him pay for the years she languished in a convent. Clio leads Merrick a merry chase, and she takes on the role of an independent alewife, driven to discover the lost recipe for ancient “heather ale,” a magical beer first made by the Picts. Surrounded by the enchanted mists that circle Camrose Castle, these head-strong adversaries embark on a sometimes passionate, sometimes hilarious battle of wills in this unusual 13th Century tale of a brave knight who seeks to claim--and tame--his bride, or so he thinks....

Jill Barnett claims she got the idea for her 13th-century romance, Wonderful, from a beer commercial, from which she learned that ale-making was one of the few occupations open to medieval women. Lady Clio is a headstrong, independent-minded young woman who would like nothing more than to rediscover the long-lost recipe for "heather ale," which was created by the Picts. Although lovely, Clio has long given up on marriage because her betrothed abandoned her to a convent six years before. When Merrick de Beaucort suddenly arrives to claim his bride, he finds that wooing the beautiful Lady Clio is as difficult and arduous as any battle he has faced. Beneath Clio's placid countenance and seemingly docile demeanor lies a lively and adventurous woman with a lot of ideas that Merrick must accept if he is ever to win her love.

352 pages, with a 4.1-star rating from 58 reviews. Text to Speech, X-Ray, enabled.



Here's today's Daily Science Fiction/Fantasy Deal, available for $1.99 today!

The Red Knight (The Traitor Son Cycle), by Miles Cameron.

Twenty eight florins a month is a huge price to pay, for a man to stand between you and the Wild.

Twenty eight florins a month is nowhere near enough when a wyvern's jaws snap shut on your helmet in the hot stink of battle, and the beast starts to rip the head from your shoulders. But if standing and fighting is hard, leading a company of men - or worse, a company of mercenaries - against the smart, deadly creatures of the Wild is even harder.

It takes all the advantages of birth, training, and the luck of the devil to do it.

The Red Knight has all three, he has youth on his side, and he's determined to turn a profit. So when he hires his company out to protect an Abbess and her nunnery, it's just another job. The abby is rich, the nuns are pretty and the monster preying on them is nothing he can't deal with.

Only it's not just a job. It's going to be a war. . .

667 pages, with a 4.4-star rating from 66 reviews. Text to Speech, X-Ray, enabled.




Here's today's Kindle Daily Deal, available for $1.99 today!

The House of the Scorpion, by Nancy Farmer.

MATTEO ALACRáN WAS NOT BORN; HE WAS HARVESTED.

His DNA came from El Patrón, lord of a country called Opium -- a strip of poppy fields lying between the United States and what was once called Mexico. Matt's first cell split and divided inside a petri dish. Then he was placed in the womb of a cow, where he continued the miraculous journey from embryo to fetus to baby.

He is a boy now, but most consider him a monster -- except for El Patrón. El Patrón loves Matt as he loves himself, because Matt is himself.

As Matt struggles to understand his existence, he is threatened by a sinister cast of characters, including El Patrón's power-hungry family, and he is surrounded by a dangerous army of bodyguards. Escape is the only chance Matt has to survive. But escape from the Alacrán Estate is no guarantee of freedom, because Matt is marked by his difference in ways he doesn't even suspect.

Fields of white opium poppies stretch away over the hills, and uniformed workers bend over the rows, harvesting the juice. This is the empire of Matteo Alacran, a feudal drug lord in the country of Opium, which lies between the United States and Aztlan, formerly Mexico. Field work, or any menial tasks, are done by "eejits," humans in whose brains computer chips have been installed to insure docility. Alacran, or El Patron, has lived 140 years with the help of transplants from a series of clones, a common practice among rich men in this world. The intelligence of clones is usually destroyed at birth, but Matt, the latest of Alacran's doubles, has been spared because he belongs to El Patron. He grows up in the family's mansion, alternately caged and despised as an animal and pampered and educated as El Patron's favorite. Gradually he realizes the fate that is in store for him, and with the help of Tam Lin, his bluff and kind Scottish bodyguard, he escapes to Aztlan. There he and other "lost children" are trapped in a more subtle kind of slavery before Matt can return to Opium to take his rightful place and transform his country.

Nancy Farmer, a two-time Newbery honoree, surpasses even her marvelous novel, The Ear, The Eye and the Arm in the breathless action and fascinating characters of The House of the Scorpion. Readers will be reminded of Orson Scott Card's Ender in Matt's persistence and courage in the face of a world that intends to use him for its own purposes, and of Louis Sachar's Holes in the camaraderie of imprisoned boys and the layers of meaning embedded in this irresistibly compelling story. (Ages 12 and older) --Patty Campbell

400 pages, with a 4.7-star rating from 413 reviews. X-Ray, enabled.



Happy Reading!

Betsy

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